Category Archives: Papers

Information Management: An interview with Bob Haycock

Bob Haycock
Bob Haycock
former Chief Architect
at OMB

BearingPoint took some time to sit down with executives in a series of discussions to get their insights into information management. This conversation is with Bob Haycock, former Chief Architect at OMB.

Bob Haycock has seen several administrations come and go in his years as an information technology (IT) executive in the federal government. Among his many positions in public service, Haycock held the post of chief architect at the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), an agency tasked with advising senior White House officials on a range of topics relating to federal policy, management, legislative, regulatory and budgetary issues.

At OMB, he spearheaded a strategic initiative revolving around enterprise architecture. As Haycock explains, the effort was a vital move to help agencies better manage their information and ease cross-agency collaboration. BearingPoint spoke with Haycock about his perspectives on information management and leadership in the federal government.

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Why life sciences companies need an end-to-end business service management solution

ls_application_management_200x113Tough challenges face pharmaceutical, medical devices and biotechnology companies today: longer time to market for new drugs or products; increased competition in a global marketplace; high research and development (R&D) costs; and complex compliance requirements. Addressing these challenges requires companies to rely on increasingly large, complex and interdependent applications that IT organizations have a hard time understanding and managing. To succeed, companies need to fully embrace IT to help grow the business, increase productivity and support innovation.

End-to-end business service management can help ease these woes. It maps end-to-end dependencies between infrastructure components, applications and the business processes they support. HP and BearingPoint have developed a Business Service Management solution for life sciences companies that provides IT organizations and application owners with real-time monitoring dashboards for applications and business processes. This holistic view of application monitoring facilitates communication and collaboration within and across IT support groups, allowing proactive responses to service degradations.

Read more about the benefits of end-to-end business service management and how it empowers life sciences companies to lead.

Information Management: An Interview with Jeff Edwards

An interview with Jeff Edwards, Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer, Wyndham Hotel Group

Jeff Edwards
Jeff Edwards
Executive Vice President
and Chief Information Officer
Wyndham Hotel group

BearingPoint took some time to sit down with executives in a series of discussion to get their insights into information management. This conversation is with Jeff Edwards, CIO of Wyndham Hotel group, whcih includes Wyndham®, Ramada®, Days Inn®, Super 8®, Wingate® by Wyndham, Baymont Inn®, Howard Johnson®, Travelodge®, Knights Inn® and AmeriHost® brands.

When Jeff assumed the role of CIO at the Wyndham Hotel Group in 2005, he immediately set out to transform its information technology (IT) organization from a cost center into a business. He focused on what would be necessary to deliver measurable value to clients—both within the company and in franchise hotel businesses. Wyndham encompasses nearly 6,500 hotels and 551,000 rooms in 59 countries.

In the conversation he discusses his unique responsibilities and why information management is a critical issue and how they are using it to deliver more meaningful information to their users. He also explores how information management helps his customers including the challenges faced and the lessons learned.

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Why are life sciences companies adopting virtual desktops?

For those who don’t know, virtual desktops are self-contained operating system images abstracted from the underlying hardware that run as virtual images on servers hosted in a data center. They can be accessed through a laptop or workstation from any remote location where there is a network connection. A desktop can be assigned to one user, or a pool of computers can be made accessible to many users.

Access to the virtual desktop environment is flexible, but virtual desktops are tightly controlled within the data center, providing centralized information storage and encrypted data communications to remote users who have safe and secure connections.

Delivering traditional desktop environments to a large, often distributed, user base is challenging and costly. In addition to investments in hardware and software, desktop management challenges include the costs of maintaining and supporting desktop computers.

Life sciences companies are adopting virtual desktops as they also face security and privacy challenges, regulatory compliance issues and desktop reliability concerns. Virtual desktops allow sensitive information to reside in a central, secure location protected by data encryption and strictly enforced user policies. The ease with which OS images are designed and provisioned supports quick and simple desktop testing, qualifying and documenting. Advanced high-availability design and resource management provide ongoing desktop services that reduce business outages.

Read more on how life sciences companies are adopting virtual desktops to cut capital and operational expenditures, and streamline desktop management. Discover how virtual desktops can give users the flexibility to collaborate and innovate, while maintaining data security through encryption and centralized storage.

CIOs take on talent management

marc_detampel_110x150
Marc Detampel
Senior Vice President
BearingPoint

chad_fry_110x150
Chad Fry
Senior Manager
BearingPoint

There was a time when chief information officers (CIOs) were only responsible for back-office technology issues, but times have changed and today’s CIOs wear many hats. In addition to strategy and business expertise, most CIOs are being asked to participate, if not lead, talent acquisition, development and retention initiatives. As we write in our recent white paper, ‘What CIOs can do to Confront the Talent Challenge,’ in many cases, it’s talent, not technology that keeps CIOs up at night.

It’s an area we’re tracking closely at BearingPoint, particularly in today’s economic climate. Despite the layoff and downsizing we hear about daily, we believe CIOs must remain diligent about hiring and retaining top talent. IT is in a somewhat unique position; many IT workers will be nearing retirement age in the next five year while interest in technology and science among college today’s college students is continuing to fall. This, of course, means finding and keeping top talent will continue to get more challenging in the coming years.

So, what’s a CIO to do? We spoke with a handful of CIOs about these issues and wrote up their findings and recommendations in our new white paper. Some of these may surprise you. It’s clear that CIOs can’t take a one-size-fits-all approach to talent strategy. For example, a CIO of a large company may be able to offer extensive career growth and personal reward, while smaller companies may be able to offer exposure to more IT projects and technologies. Whatever the size, it’s clear from our research that CIOs must remain flexible and integrate more innovative human resource strategies.

Take a look and read this report to learn what your peers are doing in the area of talent management and retention. We would love to hear about your experiences and learn what’s working and what’s not at your organization.

Information management

Eric Elliott
Eric Elliott
Director of Information
Technology,
OPTI Canada

An interview with Eric Elliott, Director of Information Technology, OPTI Canada

BearingPoint took sometime to sit down with executives in a series of discussion to get their insights into information management. This conversation is with Eric Elliott, director of information technology for OPTI, a Canadian energy company. The company, with its partner Nexen Inc., has formed a joint venture to develop oil sands projects in the Athabasca region.

He joined the company in early 2007 to help strengthen IT governance and operational processes. Given the highly regulated nature of the oil and gas industry in Canada, Eric is particularly focused on the content and document management challenges the company must address to operate successfully in the country.

In the conversation he discusses the importance of implementing an effective information management strategy at a start-up organization operating in the highly regulated fossil fuels industry. Including specifics on a current information management project they are undertaking and leading practices in dealing with your partners on information management and what lies ahead.

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Effective Change Management: Building your internal change capability

Change managementSeventy percent of all large-scale change initiatives fail to achieve their anticipated business benefit 1. That is an alarming rate of unsuccessful projects. This failure rate translates into billions of dollars in lost productivity, wasted resources, opportunity costs and rework—not to mention the human cost of lost jobs.

Companies that learn to manage change and consistently deliver expected returns from their large-scale change programs can gain competitive advantage. One survey revealed that 80 percent of CEOs called the ability to change a competitive advantage, and 82 percent identified change management as a business priority2.

This recognition of the importance of effective change management is prompting many companies to build an internal change management capability. Such capabilities can help managers change their businesses as effectively and efficiently as they’re expected to run them.

Here is a paper that presents insights and guidelines to help implement change programs.

1 – Kotter, John P., A Sense of Urgency, Harvard Business School Press, 2008.
2 – Guy, G., & Beaman, K., Effecting change in business enterprises: Current trends in change management, The Conference Board, 2005.