Tag Archives: CRM

Identifying and measuring the value of customer-centricity

Customer-centricityWhat makes a customer loyal? This high-stakes question resonates from the boardroom to the call center. Finding the right answer is more difficult—and important—than ever. Keeping customers satisfied, without unnecessarily driving up sales or services costs, is a direct path to profitable growth, especially in the face of a challenging economic environment.

“In 2009, (Forrester expects) enterprises to turn their attention from an emphasis on customer acquisition to customer retention. In a recent CustomerThink survey of more than 350 CRM professionals, ‘improving customer loyalty’ was rated as a ‘top five’ business priority by 57 percent of respondents. This was second only to ‘improving the customer experience,’ picked by 62 percent. During an economic recession, sustaining revenue growth—or forestalling revenue erosion—becomes even more critical. Customer management improvement initiatives, supported by advanced business technologies, will continue to be critical to achieving this goal.”1

Industry-leading organizations make customers’ priorities their priorities. When managing performance, they continually measure, monitor and improve what matters most to customers. As companies align their value proposition to meet customer needs, they must periodically evaluate their strategies and processes to present customers with a consistently exceptional experience.

An enterprise that embraces customer-centricity defines its processes around its customer requirements at key interaction points. In essence, the company views itself as a portfolio of customers, rather than as discrete groups of products, services, territories and/or functions. This change in orientation allows companies to effect change necessary for their business processes, organizational structures and corporate cultures so that they can achieve the benefits of customer-centricity.

So, is your company customer-centric? Tell us what makes your customer loyal. If you would like to learn more about customer loyalty, read BearingPoint’s customer loyalty white paper.

1 Forrester, Trends 2009: Customer Relationship Management, Dec. 11, 2008

The Big Switch – a podcast with Nicholas Carr

Rather than storing data and software applications down the hall in your office or in a big data center – there is a shift towards storing them on the web. And that’s the shift that Nick Carr has built his book upon.

We (America) need to jump on this paradigm shift to reduce costs in this post Sarbanes Oxley and difficult economic environment if we want to gain competitive advantage for ourselves and for our country. No longer is running enterprise CRM or ERP a competitive advantage – its table stakes.

What does this mean for IT departments? What does this mean for your data security? And most importantly – what does the impact of distributed computing have on marketers? Check out what Nick has to say about all this …

(The Big Switch – podcast with Nicholas Carr)

About Nick

A former executive editor of the Harvard Business Review, Nicholas Carr writes and speaks on technology, business, and culture. His 2004 book Does IT Matter?. published by Harvard Business School Press, set off a worldwide debate about the role of computers in business. His widely acclaimed new book, The Big Switch: Rewiring the World, from Edison to Google, examines the rise of “cloud computing” and its implications for business, media and society.

Carr writes regularly for the Financial Times, Strategy & Business and The Guardian. His articles have also appeared in the New York Times, Wired, Business 2.0, The Banker, and Advertising Age as well as on his blog Rough Type. He is a member of the Encyclopedia Britannica’s editorial board of advisors.

In 2005, Optimize magazine named Carr one of the leading thinkers on information technology, and in 2007 eWeek named him one of the 100 most influential people in IT. Earlier in his career, he was a principal at Mercer Management Consulting.

Carr has been a speaker at MIT, Harvard, Wharton, the Kennedy School of Government, NASA, and the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas as well as at many industry, corporate, and professional events throughout the Americas, Europe, and Asia. He holds a B.A. from Dartmouth College and an M.A., in English literature, from Harvard University.